Kosher

Kosher

“Kosher” is a Hebrew word that literally means “fit” or “proper.” When used in relation to food products, “kosher” means that the item in question meets the dietary requirements of Jewish law.

 

TO LEARN MORE, GO TO THE RHODE ISLAND KOSHER WEBSITE

Kosher Dairy: A “D” or the word “dairy” following the circled K or U on a product label indicates the presence of milk protein or a risk that the product is contaminated with milk protein. These products should be avoided.

Kosher Pareve: A product labeled “pareve” is considered milk-free under kosher dietary law. However, a food product may be considered pareve even if it contains a very small amount of milk protein – potentially enough to cause an allergic reaction in susceptible individuals. Do not assume that pareve-labeled products will always be safe.

1. Meat – For an animal to be Kosher, it must have split hooves and chew its cud. (Examples: cow, goat, lamb.) Non-Kosher animals include pig, horse, camel and rabbit. Kosher fowl include chicken, turkey, goose, and certain duck. Animals and fowl must be slaughtered by a specialist, called a shochet, and then soaked and salted in accordance with Jewish law. All carnivorous (meat-eating) animals and fowl, and the blood of all animals and fowl, and any derivatives or products thereof, are not Kosher.

2. Dairy – Milk and milk products (cheese, cream, butter, etc.) of a Kosher animal are Kosher-Dairy. These may not be eaten in combination with meat or fowl.

3. Parve – Foods which contain neither meat nor dairy ingredients are called “Parve.” All fruits, grains and vegetables in their natural state are Kosher and Parve. Fish which have fins and scales are Kosher and Parve. Some examples are salmon, halibut and carp. Not Kosher fish species include sturgeon, catfish and swordfish. All shellfish, eel, sharks, underwater mammals, and reptiles are not Kosher. A Parve item can become either dairy or meat when it is cooked together with food in either category. (Example: fish fried in butter is considered dairy, not Parve.)

Is Kosher Safe?


Kosher Dairy: A “D” or the word “dairy” following the circled K or U on a product label indicates the presence of milk protein or a risk that the product is contaminated with milk protein. These products should be avoided.

Kosher Pareve: A product labeled “pareve” is considered milk-free under kosher dietary law. However, a food product may be considered pareve even if it contains a very small amount of milk protein – potentially enough to cause an allergic reaction in susceptible individuals. Do not assume that pareve-labeled products will always be safe.

Gerbs Roasted and/or seasoned lines are Made, Packaged, Processed, and Shipped in our facility in the historic PK Foundry building in Johnston, Rhode Island. We do not use any cooking oils, thus everything is dry roasted at low temperatures to lock in the natural vitamins, minerals, & omega fatty acids, because we feel baking in a pool of oil is just as unhealthy as frying! We maybe a small business located in the smallest state, but we THINK BIG – Gerbs is unique compared to any of our competition, in that we handle all aspects of operation – from purchasing, production, storage, and distribution/shipping on our 100% dedicated packaging equipment by our specially trained and caring staff.

Gerbs is All Natural


  • Non-GMO
  • Chemical Free
  • Preservative Free
  • Nothing Artificial
  • Nitrates/Nitrite Free
  • Trans-Fat Free
  • MSG Free

Recognized Allergens


Our entire product line is FREE from the Top 11 Recognized Allergen’s. We inspect, roast, package, store, and ship all our lines to ensure Gerbs are: Gluten Free, Wheat Free, Peanut Free, Tree Nut Free, Legume Free (which includes beans, peas, lentils, chick peas, lupine), Soy Free, Egg Free, Sesame Free, Milk/Dairy Free, Fish Free, Crustacean Free, Shellfish Free, and Mustard Free.

Testimonial from Mari D.

It is really hard to find seeds that aren't made in a facility with nuts. These aren't, and they taste great!