DAIRY ALLERGY

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©Dairy Free Darcy GERBS ALLERGY AVENGER

About Dairy Allergies

Dairy allergy/Milk Allergy or “MA”, one of the most common food allergies in children, is an abnormal response by the body’s immune system to milk and products containing milk. Cow’s milk is the usual cause, but milk from sheep, goats, buffalo and other mammals also can cause a reaction.

An allergic reaction usually occurs minutes to hours after consuming milk. Signs and symptoms of milk allergy range from mild to severe and can include wheezing, vomiting, hives and digestive problems. Sometimes, milk allergy can cause anaphylaxis — a severe, life-threatening reaction.

Avoidance is the primary treatment for milk allergy. Fortunately, most children outgrow a milk allergy. Those who don’t outgrow it may need to continue to avoid milk products.

SYMPTOMS
(By Mayo Clinic Staff)

Milk allergy symptoms, which differ from person to person, occur a few minutes to a few hours after drinking milk or eating milk products. Immediately after consuming milk, signs and symptoms of a milk allergy might include:

  • Hives
  • Wheezing
  • Vomiting

Signs and symptoms that may take more time to develop include:

Loose stools, which may contain blood
Diarrhea
Abdominal cramps
Coughing or wheezing
Runny nose
Watery eyes
Itchy skin rash, often around the mouth
Colic, in babies

Milk Allergy or Milk Intolerance?

A true milk allergy differs from milk protein intolerance or lactose intolerance. Unlike a milk allergy, intolerance doesn’t involve the immune system. Milk intolerance causes different symptoms and requires different treatment from a true milk allergy. Common signs and symptoms of milk protein intolerance or lactose intolerance include digestive problems, such as bloating, gas or diarrhea, after consuming milk or products containing milk.

Anaphylaxis

Milk allergy can cause anaphylaxis, a life-threatening reaction that can narrow the airways and block breathing. Milk is the third most common food, after peanuts and tree nuts, to cause Anaphylaxis. If you or your child has a reaction to milk, tell your doctor, no matter how mild the reaction. Tests can help confirm a milk allergy, so you can avoid future and potentially worse reactions. Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency and requires treatment with an epinephrine (adrenaline) shot and a trip to the emergency room. Signs and symptoms start soon after consuming milk and can include:

  • Constriction of airways, including a swollen throat that makes it difficult to breathe
  • Facial flushing
  • Itching
  • Shock, with a marked drop in blood pressure

When to see doctor

See your doctor or an allergist if you or your child experiences milk allergy symptoms shortly after consuming milk. If possible, see your doctor during the allergic reaction to help the doctor make a diagnosis. Seek emergency treatment if you or your child develops signs or symptoms of Anaphylaxis.

What Foods Should I Avoid


Avoid foods that contain milk or any of these ingredients:

Butter, butter fat, butter oil, butter acid, butter ester(s)
Buttermilk
Casein
Casein hydrolysate
Caseinates (in all forms)
Cheese
Cottage cheese
Cream
Curds
Custard
Diacetyl
Ghee
Half-and-half
Lactalbumin, lactalbumin phosphate
Llactoferrin
Lactose
Lactulose
Milk (in all forms, including condensed, derivative, dry, evaporated, goat’s milk and milk from other animals, lowfat, malted, milkfat, nonfat, powder, protein, skimmed, solids, whole)
Milk protein hydrolysate
Pudding
Recaldent(R)
Rennet casein
Sour cream, sour cream solids
Sour milk solids
Tagatose
Whey (in all forms)
Whey protein hydrolysate
Yogurt

Milk is sometimes found in the following:

Artificial butter flavor
Baked goods
Caramel candies
Chocolate
Lactic acid starter culture and other bacterial cultures
Luncheon meat, hot dogs, sausages
Margarine
Nisin
Nondairy products
Nougat

Some Unexpected Sources of Milk*

  • Deli meat slicers are frequently used for both meat and cheese products.
  • Some brands of canned tuna fish contain casein, a milk protein.
  • Many non-dairy products contain casein (a milk derivative), listed on the ingredient labels.
  • Some specialty products made with milk substitutes (i.e., soy-, nut- or rice-based dairy products) are manufactured on equipment shared with milk.
  • Some meats may contain casein as a binder. Check all labels carefully.
  • Shellfish is sometimes dipped in milk to reduce the fishy odor. Ask questions about the risk of milk contact when purchasing shellfish.
  • Many restaurants put butter on steaks after they have been grilled to add extra flavor. The butter is not visible after it melts.
  • Some medications contain milk protein.

*Note: This list highlights examples of where milk has been unexpectedly found (e.g., on a food label for a specific product, in a restaurant meal, in creative cookery). This list does not imply that milk is always present in these foods; it is intended to serve as a reminder to always read the label and ask questions about ingredients before eating a food that you have not prepared yourself.
Keep in mind the following: Individuals who are allergic to cow’s milk are often advised to also avoid milk from other domestic animals. For example, goat’s milk protein is similar to cow’s milk protein and may, therefore, cause a reaction in individuals who have a milk allergy.

More Foods To Avoid


Butter, butter fat, butter oil, butter acid, butter ester(s)
Buttermilk
Casein
Casein hydrolysate
Caseinates (in all forms)
Cheese
Cottage cheese
Cream
Curds
Custard
Diacetyl
Ghee
Half-and-half
Lactalbumin, lactalbumin phosphate
Llactoferrin
Lactose
Lactulose
Milk (in all forms, including condensed, derivative, dry, evaporated, goat’s milk and milk from other animals, lowfat, malted, milkfat, nonfat, powder, protein, skimmed, solids, whole)
Milk protein hydrolysate
Pudding
Recaldent(R)
Rennet casein
Sour cream, sour cream solids
Sour milk solids
Tagatose
Whey (in all forms)
Whey protein hydrolysate
Yogurt

Milk is sometimes found in the following:

Artificial butter flavor
Baked goods
Caramel candies
Chocolate
Lactic acid starter culture and other bacterial cultures
Luncheon meat, hot dogs, sausages
Margarine
Nisin
Nondairy products
Nougat

Some Unexpected Sources of Milk*

  • Deli meat slicers are frequently used for both meat and cheese products.
  • Some brands of canned tuna fish contain casein, a milk protein.
  • Many non-dairy products contain casein (a milk derivative), listed on the ingredient labels.
  • Some specialty products made with milk substitutes (i.e., soy-, nut- or rice-based dairy products) are manufactured on equipment shared with milk.
  • Some meats may contain casein as a binder. Check all labels carefully.
  • Shellfish is sometimes dipped in milk to reduce the fishy odor. Ask questions about the risk of milk contact when purchasing shellfish.
  • Many restaurants put butter on steaks after they have been grilled to add extra flavor. The butter is not visible after it melts.
  • Some medications contain milk protein.

Gerbs Roasted and/or seasoned lines are Made, Packaged, Processed, and Shipped in our facility in the historic PK Foundry building in Johnston, Rhode Island. We do not use any cooking oils, thus everything is dry roasted at low temperatures to lock in the natural vitamins, minerals, & omega fatty acids, because we feel baking in a pool of oil is just as unhealthy as frying! We maybe a small business located in the smallest state, but we THINK BIG – Gerbs is unique compared to any of our competition, in that we handle all aspects of operation – from purchasing, production, storage, and distribution/shipping on our 100% dedicated packaging equipment by our specially trained and caring staff.

Gerbs is All Natural


  • Non-GMO
  • Chemical Free
  • Preservative Free
  • Nothing Artificial
  • Nitrates/Nitrite Free
  • Trans-Fat Free
  • MSG Free

Recognized Allergens


Our entire product line is FREE from the Top 11 Recognized Allergen’s. We inspect, roast, package, store, and ship all our lines to ensure Gerbs are: Gluten Free, Wheat Free, Peanut Free, Tree Nut Free, Legume Free (which includes beans, peas, lentils, chick peas, lupine), Soy Free, Egg Free, Sesame Free, Milk/Dairy Free, Fish Free, Crustacean Free, Shellfish Free, and Mustard Free.

Testimonial from Kerry P.

This is the best pumpkin seed that we have ever eaten. My sister and I have been eating pumpkin seeds since childhood. These seeds remind us of the ones we ate over fifty years ago. Not too salty and very fresh. The perfect pumpkin seed. A perfect snack.